Reforms are Needed to Increase Public Funding in Israel’s Health System
Author: Dov Chernichovsky Policy Research

Historically, the Israeli health care system has been considered a high-performance system, providing universal, affordable, high-quality care to all residents.

However, a decline in the ratio of physicians to population that reached a modern low in 2006, an approximate ten-percentage-point decline in the share of publicly financed health care between 1995 and 2009, and legislative mandates that favored private insurance have altered Israel’s health care system for the worse. Many Israelis now purchase private health insurance to supplement the state-sponsored universal care coverage, and they end up spending more out of pocket even for services covered by the entitlement. Additionally, many publicly paid physicians moonlight at private facilities to earn more money. In this article I recommend that Israel increase public funding for health care and adopt reforms to address the rising demand for privately funded care and the problem of publicly paid physicians who moonlight at private facilities.

In Hebrew only. This article was originally published in English here and is available for Health Affairs members or for purchase. 

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